Concerts in the Attic is a not-for-profit house concert series hosted by Steve Long and Ed and Sarah Rogers. Held in the attic (that's right, the attic) of Ed and Sarah's one-hundred-year old house in Fort Worth's historic Fairmount neighborhood, the series features top-notch singer/songwriters performing in an intimate setting for an appreciative and attentive audience of music lovers.

Concerts are usually held on Sundays beginning at 5pm*, and are followed by an acoustic song circle until 11pm. Guests are encouraged to bring acoustic instruments, potluck dishes and their beverage of choice. A suggested donation is collected during each show, all going directly to the performer.

 

Seating for each concert is limited to 30 guests and is by invitation only. To request an invitation, please send an email, with the name of the performer in the subject line, to steve@concertsintheattic.com.

* Guests are encouraged to arrive thirty minutes to an hour prior to showtime so that shows are not delayed.

 

 
To request an invitation, send an email with THE ARTIST'S NAME in the subject line to steve@concertsintheattic.com.
THIS IS THE ONLY METHOD TO RESERVE SEATS. Requests sent via Facebook cannot be honored.
 

 
2014-2015 Season:
 

September 21: Bob Livingston

October 5: Jimmy Davis
October 26: Nels Andrews
November 9: Jonathan Byrd
December 14: Jay Johnson & Joe Pat Hennen
January 11: Michael Hearne
February 8: Walt Wilkins
February 22: Sara Hickman
March 22: Robyn Ludwick
April 19: Chuck Pyle
May 3: James Michael Taylor & Jacob Furr
 

 
 

 
Hey folks! CITA host Ed Rogers has music available for download on iTunes. Check it out! And check out his web site at edrogersmusic.com.
 
 

 

Sunday, May 3, 2015 - 5pm
James Michael Taylor & Jacob Furr
Doors at 4pm - pay what you can - RESERVE SEATS

This event will be simulcast on Concert Window. Pay what you can. Just click the link to watch the show!

 

Shortly after Tom Dooley started the Folk Era and he acquired a banjo, James Michael Taylor wrote his first song. Actually what came to be called a co-write, when a high school girlfriend sent him a poem.

Hitting college with a banjo and a head full of The Kingston Trio, JMT majored in speech but his real occupation was music. He sang in the choir, sang lead in the men's quartette, was featured in college musicals and sent to represent the college in folk duos and trios at church banquets around Oklahoma and Texas.

Called to duty, he arrived by rail at Fort Ord, banjo in tow, and racked up nine days good time at Basic Training before he was called upon and refused to disembowel a straw dummy with the bayonet.

Reunited with his banjo after almost two years locked up at first in the Fort Ord stockade and then at Leavenworth, and writing a shitload of essays, lyrics and rants, Taylor found the old songs just weren't quite specific enough and he started taking them apart and putting them back together to suit his very personal voice.

A real bio would just be his songs strung together because it's all there in his songs and being updated weekly.

Including an album in February and another in March, JMT has produced 50 albums containing over 700 songs.

 
 

 
Do-it-yourself is not a new idea to the family of Jacob Furr. Born and raised down the street from his grandfather's machine shop in Fort Worth, Texas, Furr's heritage is one of work that sweats through blue collars and hardens hands. His songs are crafted as precision pieces to expose and explore personal struggles and triumphs of love. Building on the blueprints of the folk-rock legends of the 60's and 70's like Tom Petty, Jim Croce, Gordon Lightfoot, Dan Fogelburg, and Nick Drake, with a modern sonic twist, each song is an honest telling of story or emotion, with an integrity of structure and usefulness of line. Furr continually tours the United States, has won regional songwriting competitions (Bluelight Live Fall Singer Songwriter Competition 2014) and opened for artists such as Shovels & Rope, David Ramirez, Evan Felker (Turnpike Troubadors), Hayes Carll, These United States, and Elliot Brood.